3 On 3 Preview And Chat: The Minnesota Timberwolves

Phillip Barnett —  February 4, 2014

1. With both Steve Nash and Steve Blake back, how do you think the Lakers should approach the rotation for these two guys specifically?

Darius: D’Antoni has already said that Nash will play the first 6-8 minutes of each half and that’s it. I think this is the smart move as it should help him remain loose after warm-ups and not have to go into the game cold after going to the bench for any extended amount of time. As for Blake, I’d like to see him ease his way back into the lineup and play 20-25 minutes. That said, I’d prefer Blake play more point guard than shooting guard if playing against any other lineup than the Rubio/Barea combination the ‘Wolves can throw out there. As we saw earlier this year, Blake performed much better when he was at the point and in trying to put him in the best position to succeed, I’d like to see his minutes come at that spot. Considering Nash’s court time should be around 15 minutes, Blake and Marshall should both be able to see extensive time at the point without it being an issue.

Phillip: It’s been reported that Nash likely won’t play more than 10-16 minutes tonight, and only the first few minutes of each half. With that said, I think the most ideal situation would be for D’Antoni to split the rest of the time at point guard between Steve Blake and Kendall Marshall. It wouldn’t make sense to play Blake a huge number of minutes in his first game back in about two months. Staggering the minutes Nash isn’t on the floor between Blake and Marshall should make things a seamless transition for all point guards involved.

2. Considering both Nash and Blake were immediately thrown into the starting role, what are you expecting from Kendall Marshall off the bench? Does his new role affect his mindset in tonight’s game?

Darius: I hope Marshall’s mindset doesn’t change at all. He is at his best setting up others, but he needs to continue to balance that with looking for his own offense when an opening is there. Considering he’s likely to see a dip in minutes, I would also like to see him extend a bit more effort on the defensive side of the ball. Marshall will never be a strong defender — his athletic limitations make it so he’ll struggle defending in space and against quick attacking players — but he can do a bit more to hustle back on D, look to make the extra rotation more often, and generally try to do more of the dirty work that is required of the guards when the big men are forced to help outside the paint. These have not been areas where Marshall has done well at this season, but with less responsibility to guide the offense for most of the game, maybe that can change.

Phillip: I’m obviously reaching here, but one of the benefits of having such a limited roster since Marshall joined the team is that there isn’t much of a disparity in talent from his court mates when he was starting to who he’ll be asked to lead when he enters the game as a reserve. From that standpoint, his mindset should remain consistent with what he’s had in the last month and do the things that have found him the most success. Keep his teammates involved, continue to initiate the offense and look for his shots when the opportunities present themselves. He’s been doing better with the latter in the last couple of weeks, but that’s going to continue to be his weakness on the offensive end because of the nature of his game.

3. What is the single most important factor in the Lakers recording a win tonight?

Darius: Can we make sure Kevin Love’s car doesn’t have snow tires? Because if he doesn’t show up tonight, the Lakers’ chances of winning go up dramatically. In all seriousness, getting Love to play a below average game is the team’s best chance to win. Ryan Kelly will need to do his best to stick with Love on the perimeter and the entire team will need to battle on the glass to make sure that he doesn’t have one of those 20 rebound nights with 8-10 on the offensive side. A 20 and 10 night from Love can be countered with production from enough Lakers to keep the game close. A 35 and 18 night and the Lakers are likely sunk.

Phillip: Keep the game close. One of the strangest narratives to follow this season has been the ‘Wolve’s inability to close out close games. This isn’t to say that the Lakers have been excellent down the stretch, but the Timberwolves propensity to lose those games has become a story this year. They’re currently 4-15 in games decided two possessions with seven of those losses being one-possession games and three of them losses by a single point. Neither of the previous games have been close (blowouts going both ways), but a close game could prove to be interesting and contribute to a story that’s been developing all season.

Where you can watch: 5 p.m. on TWC SportsNet or you can listen on ESPN 710.


Phillip Barnett

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