Los Angeles Lakers Player Grades: Jordan Farmar

Daniel Rapaport —  May 13, 2014

General Thoughts on the Season

Like so many Lakers, Jordan Farmar’s homecoming season (he’s a graduate of Taft High School in Woodland Hills) was plagued by a multitude of nagging injuries. His calf, hamstring and groin wouldn’t cooperate all season, and he was only able to suit up for 41 games. Farmar had four separate stretches in which he missed at least 4 games. All of this makes it tough to accurately assess Farmar’s year, as it’s important to remember than any time a player is coming back from missing multiple games they’re not quite right the first game back. So often this season it felt that just as Jordan got back into rhythm, his bummy hamstring would return him to the pine for the foreseeable future.

When he was indeed on the floor, Farmar was a useful and important player for the Lakers. He possesses something that the other point guards on the roster don’t: the quick first step needed to at least try and defend the Russell Westbrooks and Damian Lillards of the world. He shot a very solid 43.8% from behind the arc and proved the ability to get white-hot.

He’s now an unrestricted free agent who should see decent interest from teams looking for a strong shooter in a backup point guard. He’s been vocal about wanting to remain a Laker no matter who the next coach is. But Farmar signed for the minimum last summer, and with the Lakers’ eyes on big-name free agents, he’ll likely have to accept a similar contract this year if he does want to remain in Lakerland.

Strengths/Weaknesses

Shotchart 1400011620508

As stated previously, Farmar is a more than capable three-point shooter, especially from the corners. What sticks out on this shot chart is the midrange-success. In the new basketball world driven by analytics, these long two-point jumpers have become quazi-blasphemous, as the numbers favor layups and three-pointers. So, analyze his midrange success however you like, but realize that Famar is a surprisingly adequate mid-range shooter, as well.

Farmar never has been, and likely never will be effective when he goes to the hoop. While he’s a pretty good athlete and leaper, Farmar lacks the aggression to bang with the bigs down low and the dexterity required to finish efficiently.

Farmar showed an ability to get hot and stay hot this season that I can’t remember him displaying in previous years. On Feb. 28, Farmar erupted for a career high 30 points on 8-10 shooting from three. He was 5-7 from behind the arc at Brooklyn on Nov. 27, 5-8 at Cleveland on Feb. 5, 4-5 against Denver on March 7….you get the picture. The moral of the story is: when Farmar’s feeling it, get that boy that rock.

While a 106.9 defensive rating is far form impressive, when you factor in that the Lakers as a team had a defensive rating 110.6, it becomes a bit more acceptable. Farmar has good size and burst for a point guard, which are two of the most important factors when it comes to defense. For comparison, Kendall Marshall had a defensive rating of 109.0, Nash a 112.0, and Blake also a 112.0. Numbers don’t lie; Farmar was LAL’s best defensive point guard option this season, though that’s really not saying much.

Most Memorable Moment

Farmar catches fire to the tune of a career-high 30 piece on 8-10 shooting from downtown.

Overall Grade and Summary

Farmar showed some bright spots this year, averaged a career high in points, and proved to be the Laker’s best point guard defender. But I’m just hesitant to give any player on this team a favorable grade. Basketball is about winning games. The Lakers didn’t do that this season. By definition, it was a failure. I look at this season like a group project: If the entire team’s season was the project, they certainly would receive no better than a C- that’s what happens you fail to do what you set out to do (win games). When the group project receives such a poor grade, each individual team member is essentially disqualified from receiving an A- the project was just too damn bad! That’s why Farmar, despite having a relatively solid season (and a cost-effective one) receives a B-.

But if he’s willing to come back for the right price, as he says he is, he’s a solid backup point guard who has the ability to get hot off the bench once in a while. If the Lakers can secure him for the veteran’s minimum, they should do so- it’s always good for the locker-room dynamic to have a player who genuinely wants to be there. And Jordan Farmar, through and through, wants to be a Laker.

Daniel Rapaport

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