Archives For Game Recap

All of this spells some trouble for the Lakers as they face a team with specific match ups that have been problematic this year. If there are two positions the Lakers haven’t been able to handle well this season it’s been skilled power forwards and shooting guards with size who can really score. The Warriors’ game immediately comes to mind, but also the Pelicans’ game where Anthony Davis had his way on both ends. With Love and Martin, the question isn’t necessarily how to slow them down — there are game plans that can be put in place to limit one or both — but whether the Lakers even have the personnel to do so.

Love has evolved into the premier stretch big man in the league. He can not only hit the three ball, but has the ability to put the ball on the floor against a close out against bigger players or post up and dominate the offensive glass against smaller ones. The Lakers don’t have a player with the combination of size, quickness, and rebounding prowess to limit Love and that can lead to Love having his way in this game. As for Martin, his style of running off screens and cutting actively against aggressive defenders is one that Steve Blake is used to defending, but with his size and craftiness off the dribble, Blake will still have his problems containing Martin in all that he does.

What the Lakers need, then, is to be as sharp as they can be in their half court defense and understand where to be in help situations at all times. Love and Martin have the ability to play 25 feet away from the rim and still be effective and it’s in combatting that spacing where the Lakers need to be sharp. Can Gasol, Kaman, Hill, and Wes Johnson rotate from the paint to the perimeter and then back to the paint to contest shots and rebound? Can the wings shade their man and limit penetration while making the correct back side rotation to either contest shots on the wing or body up a big man crashing the offensive glass? And, most importantly, can these groups of players work in unison to accomplish these tasks on any given play and not suffer miscommunications that can lead to wide open shots or easy put-backs? If they can, the Lakers will be in this game throughout. If they can’t, this could get out of hand early.

The above is from the preview for this game. So, while I hate to say I told you so…well, I told you so.

The Lakers lost this game in the 1st quarter when the Wolves used blistering shooting from Kevin Love and Kevin Martin to take a 24 point lead into the 2nd period. I could go on and on about how it happened, but all you really need to know comes from these two tweets:

That’s right, with the 1st period almost over, the Lakers, as a team, had been outscored by Love and were tied with Kevin Martin. By the time the period was over, the team trailed by 24 points and the game was essentially over.

We could get into the details, but the how is really immaterial, right? This may not be who the Lakers are every night, but it’s who they’re possible of being on any given night. And it’s certainly who they likely will be when the match ups line up a certain way and things tilt against them just enough that those match ups get exploited.

So, really, I don’t know if there’s a lesson to be learned here. At least not one we weren’t already at least partially aware of. The Lakers are capable of being bad. The “how” in this equation matters if you really want to dive deep into an analysis, but when it comes to wins and losses the “how” becomes less relevant. Whether it’s bad defense, bad offense, or a little (or even a lot) of both the losses will come when you don’t play every minute hard and when you don’t have the talent other team’s have.

In that respect, this was a loss we could see coming. And if you read the three paragraphs cited at the top of this post, we saw it coming. This team will surprise on some nights, but in this game they didn’t; in this game the things that didn’t favor them in this match up were exploited by their opponent. It really is that simple. Other nights, that won’t be the case. Against different opponents, the Lakers may play above their heads (or their opponents play below theirs) and it will shift the terms the game is played on. Minnesota did the dictating in this game, however. It probably won’t be the last time this happens to the Lakers this season either.

The final score didn’t indicate how close the game was throughout. The Pelicans beat the Lakers, 96-85.

The overall game was pretty tough to watch; both teams weren’t shooting very well (Lakers shot under 39 percent). But the game never got away from either team until the last few minutes. The Pelicans were only leading by three, 84-81, with 3:30 left in the game. After Anthony Davis made a jumper (more on him in a bit), here’s what the next few possessions looked like for the Lakers.

*Bad pass by Steve Blake. (Eric Gordon makes two foul shots.)
*Pau Gasol gets blocked. (Shot clock violation by the Pelicans.)
*Bad pass by Nick Young. (Tyreke Evans follow basket.)
*Bad pass by Steve Blake. (Davis bucket.)
*Pau Gasol gets blocked again. (Davis bucket and draws the foul for a three-point play.)

Add in the Jrue Holiday free throw and it was a 12-0 run in less than three minutes. That, of course, put away the game.

Davis was dominant the entire game (one of the few aesthetically-pleasing things about this game; I meant his play, of course). He had 32 points, 12 rebounds, and six blocks. Pau Gasol (3/12 FG shooting) couldn’t do anything against him.

Chris Kaman did play well and showed an array of spin moves. He led the Lakers in scoring with 16 points. Curiously enough, he didn’t play in the fourth quarter in favor of Jordan Hill. Hill did grab 13 rebounds in 21 minutes of play. Steve Blake played a nice floor game with 13 points and eight assists but those two bad passes he threw loomed large. Nick Young (13 points) and Jodie Meeks (11 points) put in some steady shooting. Pau Gasol’s struggles are starting to concern me but he did go against Anthony Davis in this game. Still, it’s something to think about. Going into this game, Gasol and Meeks led the Lakers in scoring at 12.5 points per contest. I’m sure Gasol can do better than that.

The Lakers couldn’t stop Davis and take care of the basketball at the end of the game. That’s what ultimately cost them. Maybe they were tired after that emotional win over Houston. I don’t know. All I know is that lack of execution will not win you a game.

At least, the Lakers are fighting? I didn’t exactly expect them to win this road game. But they fought and went down swinging and, sometimes, that’s all you can ask for. On the bright side, I’m glad there weren’t many camera shots of the Pelicans’ frightening mascot. That thing does not look like a pelican; that’s a psychotic chicken.

The Lakers are now 3-4; the record is certainly better than what I expected after seven games (I’m sure you guys have a different opinion and that’s fine). The Minnesota Timberwolves are visiting Staples at Sunday. Maybe they can get back on track at home.

Sometimes it is better to just enjoy the moment and skip the analysis. Steve Blake’s last second shot is one of those moments.

Whether the Lakers’ players publicly admit to wanting this game a bit more than the others doesn’t really matter. The joy on their faces after Blake sunk his game winner says it all. After letting a big first half lead slip away with some dreadful second half play and the Rockets finally putting in an effort on both sides of the ball, the Lakers came from behind to steal a much needed win on the road.

The game wasn’t pretty. Pau Gasol seemingly used up all his legs trying to push Dwight Howard off the post, leading to a dreadful shooting night. Steve Nash had a good first half, but struggled in the second with his shot and in creating for others. The bench did their best to try and pick up the team, but besides some timely shot making and a few hustle plays they mostly just tugged on the back of the Rocket’s shirts as they tried to run away from them and take the game they’ll probably kick themselves over losing.

But, really, the only thing to take away from this game is in the video above. Blake came through when his team needed him the most. So while the Lakers could have easily kicked themselves for giving away a game they controlled most of the night, they head to New Orleans riding the high of a last second win. A win that, for all the other little things that mattered, they can thank Steve Blake for.

Through 4 games the Lakers are 2-2 which, if we’re being honest is a bit of a surprise. After playing 3 contenders to reach the western conference finals and a borderline eastern playoff team, 0-4 wouldn’t have been a surprise and 1-3 would have been viewed as the most likely scenario. The team’s .500 record doesn’t make this team a world beater by any means, but it does show that they’re a bit more competitive than some would have thought. Whether that lasts is another story, but as of now the Lakers look like a feisty bunch that plays a style that can cause teams some problems.

The Hawks game was a perfect example of who this team can be. In the first half, the Lakers found their stride on offense, raining shots from the outside while showing enough activity defensively to give the Hawks some problems. The ball movement wasn’t perfect, but it was good enough to create good looks for the team’s shooters and the defensive rotations, while also not perfect, were good enough to force the Hawks into some misses. The combination of both allowed the Lakers to build a comfortable lead they could carry into the second half.

In those final two quarters, though, the Lakers also showed how the style they play can lead to their downfall. Being reliant on making jumpers is always dangerous and when those attempts went errant, the offense got off track. Defensively they became less attentive and those holes sprung leaks the Hawks took advantage of. Kyle Korver’s second half shooting helped close the gap on a game the Lakers were controlling and down the stretch of the game things got tight enough where nervousness of a loss was very real. When a crazy sequence of a block/charge call went in Pau Gasol’s favor with the subsequent two free throws going down combined with Pau closing out on and blocking one last Korver bomb was finally played out, we could all breathe a sigh of relief that the team held on.

This is probably what a lot of games will look like for the rest of the season so I hope you have a strong heart. The Lakers don’t have an abundance of talent, a fact that will still be true even when Kobe returns. Kobe will help, of course, and his presence will give the team more structure in late game situations, but the rest of the roster is still made up of multiple guys trying to earn a place in this league and with that will come ups and downs that aren’t easily escapable.

In any event, the team is .500 through 4 games and that’s undoubtedly a nice surprise heading into a rough stretch on the road that begins tomorrow. We’ll find out more about this team on that trip, but even with those new things we’ll learn it simply adds to the things we already know (or at least the things we think we know). So, on that note, some more thoughts from last game and the trends we’re learning through the three before it…

*Mike D’Antoni has a problem to solve in terms of his rotation and it’s not necessarily a bad one, or, for that matter, an easy one. For the type of offense he wants to run, this roster is not balanced. He has three point guards – Nash, Farmar, and Blake – who all should see floor time. He also has three centers – Pau, Kaman, and Hill – who all deserve time. His answers on the wing are mostly unproven, minimum salaried players who all have holes in their games. His stretch power forwards are a guy who was out of the league last year and a guy who has never played the position before. But, in stretches, all of these players have shown capable and are worth giving looks to. Managing this is not easy and, this early in the season, it’s not exactly crystal clear how the rotation should shake out. In other words, put away your pitchforks for now as these things get sorted out.

*All that said, let’s not act as if we don’t have hints as to what’s working and what’s not. Jordan Hill deserves more minutes. Yes, Hill has become a “closer” of sorts who comes in late and impacts the game down the stretch to either keep a game close or help the team win. But, it’s safe to say he should probably get more minutes in other parts of the game to try and make sure the ends of games aren’t as close. Who those minutes come at the expense of isn’t perfectly clear, but one candidate is Shawne Williams, even if it’s not Hill who ends up playing PF. One solution could be to play Kaman and Pau together a bit more and then let Hill play C with the second unit he seems to thrive with.

*Another player who could see an uptick in minutes is Jodie Meeks. Before the season I said Meeks would probably play his way out of the rotation, but it’s actually been the opposite. Meeks is shooting the ball well, making better decisions with the ball in his hands, and still displaying the hustle the coaches love. Yes he can still be turnover prone due to a shaky (though improved) handle, but when a guy is giving 50/40/90 shooting through four games, he deserves his praise. Meeks could likely see some more minutes at the expense of Steve Blake who is still competing well and dishing out assists, but not hitting enough shots considering the opportunities he’s getting. I expect Blake to start to hit those shots at some point, but until he does it’s hard to say he should be play the team’s most minutes as he did against the Hawks.

*Pau Gasol had a dreadful shooting night against the Hawks and looked low on energy for some stretches. After the game it was found out he’s been dealing with a respiratory infection, so part of that can be explained/excused. That said, Pau must still find a way to be less of a long two point shot taker and more of a guy who’s working closer to the paint. Pau has historically been a good mid-range shooter so I don’t want to take that part of his game away. However, if he rolled more towards the paint out of the P&R rather than being a stationary target and popping for the long jumper, I think he can have more success and be more of a threat to the defense. Get him on the move some and he can up fake and drive, make the skip pass to shooters on the wing, or still just shoot his jumper. Basically, I want Pau to have more options, not fewer.

*The Xavier Henry/Nick Young swap as starter worked out well for both gus ys. I want to see if that will remain to be true, but I liked how Young looked on the second unit – he even drove and created shots for others – just as I liked Henry’s aggressiveness in attacking the rim with the starting group. I think Henry’s 2-4 from behind the arc isn’t going to be there on most nights, but his driving and foul drawing will be and considering the starters don’t have a guy who draws a lot of fouls in that group, I like how his game complements theirs. Hopefully this continues. Young, meanwhile, seemed a bit looser coming off the bench and seemed to fit in better with the free-wheeling style of the reserves. Maybe it’s weird to say, but his decision making seemed to fit in better with that group and moving forward I expect that to be the case as long as Farmar remains a reserve.

As I wrote in the game preview, the Lakers faced circumstances that were far from ideal against the Warriors. Not only were they playing the second night of a back to back after a big win last night, but they were doing so on the road, against a team playing in their home opener, who also happens to be one of the better outfits in the conference. Well, all those variables came to a head in this game as the Warriors simply outclassed the Lakers, routing them to the tune of 125-94.

There’s really no need to go into much detail about the Lakers performance in this contest. Defensively, they looked disorganized and had too many instances of miscommunication. Rotations were missed on the perimeter — a deadly mistake against a team with the caliber of shooters the Warriors have — and when big men helped inside no one covered for them on the backside and that resulted in easy shots at the rim either off dump off passes or put-backs. The team also struggled to contain dribble penetration which opened up kick-out and skip passes to shooters when defenders got sucked into the paint. Further, by playing small-ish lineups against a team with good size at every position except point guard, the Lakers ended up double teaming more than they’d want, resulting in even more open jumpers when the Warriors moved the ball.

Offensively, the Lakers simply couldn’t hit shots. Their 39% success rate from the floor seems like generous score keeping based off how often the team missed. Credit the Warriors’ defense for a lot of the Lakers’ struggles on that side, but the team also missed shots that fell just a night earlier. Jumpers went halfway down and spun out, inside shots fell off the side of the rim, and their 3 point shots didn’t find the mark. The team did have some success finishing at the rim later in the contest, but all that did was make a horrid shooting night seem somewhat better than it actually was.

All in all, this game was an inverse of what the team did the night before. The bench never really found a groove and the starters, while okay in spurts, were simply outgunned by a very good Warriors’ first five. There’s no harm in that, especially considering the circumstances of the game mentioned at the top (not to mention that Nash didn’t play, so the rotations were thrown off some), but it’s still a tough pill to swallow when the 2nd half devolves into an attempt to avoid losing by 30.

In the end, it’s best to just forget this game as quickly as possible and hope that the team can put together a better effort on Friday against the Spurs. If you’d have told me that after the first two games the Lakers would be 1-1, I’d have taken it, so despite the ugliness witnessed in this game, it’s time to move on.