Archives For Laker News

Earlier in the day Friday the Lakers waived Kendall Marshall, simultaneously creating some cap space but also creating an extra roster spot to fill. The team wasted little time in filling Marshall’s vacated spot, and more, inking some familiar faces to contracts:

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The Lakers are not done making moves, apparently. In an effort to open up a sliver of cap space (more on this in a minute), the team has moved on from the Kendall Marshall era (at least in the short term):

Marshall’s salary for this upcoming season — $915,243 — was not guaranteed, so the Lakers take no hit for waiving Marshall and open up that amount of cap space. This may not seem important, but, in reality, it was a needed move if the team wants to keep Ryan Kelly while also signing Nick Young to his reported deal. 

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I actually don’t know what to say about this. Here’s Marc Stein from ESPN with this news:

I don’t get it.

The Lakers paid a LOT of money to keep Jordan Hill. They drafted a promising Julius Randle. Just yesterday, they claimed Ed Davis. And we all thought that it’s inevitable for Ryan Kelly to come back. I was looking forward to the Lakers developing these young players and seeing if Jordan Hill can be a 30-minute-per-game player.

This Carlos Boozer acquisition mucks it all up. I mean, what am I not seeing here that the Lakers are? Boozer is going to take away lots of minutes from the young guys. He’s a better fit for a contending team and we all know that the Lakers are far from that. Why stunt Randle’s development?

Boozer is pretty much all midrange jumpers at this point of his career. Your grandmother can play better defense than him and Boozer yells more than an intense Street Fighter II fight. I mean, I guess he can be the grizzled veteran that can mentor the kids here but I think I’m pushing it at this point.

Yeah. I’m not a fan of this transaction. And I’m actually NICER than a lot of people about Carlos Boozer.

Well, the Lakers added another big man in the mix. Here’s Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo! Sports:

It’s another cheap deal, just like the Lakers have been giving out throughout the offseason (except Swaggy P).

Davis was drafted 13th overall by the Toronto Raptors in 2010. He had a promising rookie season (averaging 7.7 points and 7.1 rebounds per game) before dropping off a bit. He was the supposed centerpiece of the Rudy Gay trade when Memphis acquired him but Lionel Hollins never gave him consistent minutes. He pretty much had the same role, too, when Dave Joerger took over. Davis only averaged 5.7 points and 4.1 rebounds per game in 15 minutes of play last season.

Ed Davis’s game isn’t the greatest offensively. He doesn’t have much going on in the post. However, on the defensive end, he’s been a pretty good rim protector and tends to affect a lot of shots inside. His athleticism is salivating but, unfortunately, he doesn’t seem to have improved much since he first got drafted due to not playing consistently.

Low-risk, high-reward. We’ll see how Ed Davis does with L.A.

Friday was a wild day for the Lakers. What started with a glimmer of hope that Carmelo Anthony might still decide to bring his talents to tinseltown, ended with the Lakers seemingly spending all their cap space on acquiring Jeremy Lin from the Rockets, re-signing Nick Young to a 4-year contract, and re-upping Jordan Hill for an additional two years (with a team option on that second season).

Not necessarily how many fans envisioned the team’s day evolving, that’s for sure.

The question isn’t what these moves bring to the Lakers, that’s really the easy part of all this. All three players are pretty proven commodities who fans should be quite familiar with. We’ll evaluate them more in time, but not now. That’s because there is a bigger question at hand: do the Lakers have one more move in them?

As mentioned above, the Lakers have seemingly used all their cap space on the aforementioned three players. In Lin ($8.37 million), Hill ($9 million), and Young (not yet known, but a 1st year salary of roughly $4.5 million is possible) the team’s nearly $22 million in cap space would be spent if all these deals were signed in the next 24 hours.

But, will they be?

If you want the Lakers to continue to be players on the free agent market, you should hope they won’t be. Because despite having commitments to those players, the Lakers can still try to do a bit more simply by using timing and various mechanics of the CBA to their advantage. The LA Times’ Eric Pincus explained this via twitter:

Okay, the difference between Hill’s cap hold and expected salary (roughly $2.3 million) and the room exception (an exception for teams who fall beneath the salary cap to sign another player above the minimum) don’t sound exciting, but they are options to sign a couple of more players who could help the team.

These aren’t the only cap gymnastics the Lakers could try, however. More from Pincus:

Pau Gasol is not going to be a Laker next year (more on this at another time), but the Lakers can still try to facilitate a sign and trade as Pincus notes. It would have to be perfectly timed and the Lakers would be limited in how much money they could bring back — they would need at least $13.5 million left of their cap space to sign Young and Hill. This isn’t much, but if a team wants to give up an asset for Pau while not sending much salary back it could be explored.

The only way for the Lakers to really up their cap space is to use the stretch provision on Steve Nash. This would turn their $2.3 million of cap space into close to $9 million in cap space. That would be enough to chase one high potential, second-tier free agent (Lance Stephenson?) or multiple mid-level free agents who could be part of the rotation. This may be far-fetched, but it is an option that still exists. And if you want the Lakers to be as good as they can be next season, you should hope that they explore all these options.

Of course, these are all just hypotheticals. And considering how quickly the Lakers moved in making the moves they did on Friday, I’d bet they are done looking. Add in that “stretching” Nash keeps money on the books beyond next summer and into years where the team is hoping to have clean books, it only adds further doubt they would take these measures. Instead, I would imagine they are destined to now fill out the roster much like they did this past year — chasing low cost players who need to rehabilitate their games and wouldn’t mind doing it on the stage the Lakers offer.

One can hope they still have one more trick up their sleeve, though. Because while I can live with what they have done to this point, I’d be lying if I said I wouldn’t like at least one more.