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One of my favorite parts of the old Lakers’ telecasts on KCAL Channel 9 was Chick Hearn interviewing players from the Lakers and the opposing team. The interviews would often air during the pre-game or halftime show and would always give some insight or an anecdote that you likely weren’t going to get from anywhere else. Credit Chick who, along with his brilliance as the game’s best play by play man, was also as personable and pleasant as could be when chatting with the players.

This video, however, is one that I’d never seen. After starting his first career game the night before — a game in which he’d scored 12 points on 5-11 shooting — Chick sat down with rookie Kobe Bryant for a chat:

Some good stuff in this clip, but the thing that stands out is Kobe’s youth and, even at only 18 years old, the charisma and charm that, along with his prodigious talent, made him one of the league’s most popular players very early in his career. This clip also brings out a fair amount of nostalgia. This was before Phil Jackson, before the heartbreaking playoff losses, before the championships, and before the feuds that saw it all end. This was just the beginning.

With Kobe’s career nearing its end, it really is something to see him so young, so long ago, as a bright eyed rookie. In a way it makes me sad. It also makes me feel extremely grateful that nearly 18 years later he is still wearing the purple and gold. Oh, an by the way, that night against the Spurs on the 2nd night of a back to back, Kobe started his second straight game and scored 19 points on 6-12 shooting to help the Lakers win their 5th straight game.

(H/T to Andy Kamenetzky and Jon Weisman for the clip)

Training camp is only two days old, but I’m already thirsting to see what this group of players looks like on the floor together. Luckily, the fine folks at Lakers.com are of the same mindset and were nice enough to gift us all with some highlights from the scrimmage portion of Wednesday’s practice session:

Understand that these are clips pieced together from a lot of stop and go action where the coaches will intervene to use a particular play or two as teaching moments. This may allow an offensive player to get the type of position he may not otherwise or a side’s defense to get set and bottle up a certain action.

Even in saying that, though, it sure is nice to see actual basketball.

A couple of quick takeaways:

*Over the last couple of days, when asked about his health, Kobe Bryant has said that he “feels like (himself)” multiple times and the brief clips seem to reinforce that idea. He’s moving well, seems to get good elevation on his jumper, and made a decent defensive play on Nick Young by sliding his feet fairly well and recovering at the end of the action to get his hands on the ball. He also had  couple of nice possessions working in the post and his footwork looked clean and precise. Again, these are spliced together clips that do not give us an entire picture of what Kobe fully looks like over the course of a full session, but these plays do start to lessen concerns that he is not 100% physically right now. Considering where he was at this point last year and how he looked when he first got back into game action after the season began, this is a very positive thing.

*Steve Nash also looks to be moving well. I do not want to overplay the significance of this since, as we all know, Nash’s problems aren’t so much how he plays when healthy, but whether or not his health is sustainable. But it’s nice to see Nash running fluidly and making some of the plays you know a healthy Nash is capable of making. The fading jumper he hit wasn’t anything to get super excited about, but it did show him extend for a loose ball and then create some needed separation to get his shot off against his man. These are skills Nash has mastered over his career, but also ones that have not always been at his disposal over the past two seasons due to his diminished health.

*Whether it was just the nature of the plays selected to highlight or indicative of what the team will try to do regularly, the team sure did seam to try to push the ball up the floor. Nash and Lin both like to play in the open court, so it would not surprise me if they tried to play with more pace than Scott’s team have been known for in the past. I’m not making any declarations at this point, but this will be something to watch for when the exhibition games start.

Overall, there’s really not a lot of deep analysis to be made here. Again, it’s a scrimmage with a fair amount of stopping the action and specific teaching moments from a coaching staff who is just starting to learn about the group they have (as well as the players learning what the coaches want). But, I’d be lying if I said watching the guys get up and down the floor and finish some plays didn’t get me itching for more.

At its essence, basketball is a game of leverage and angles. The best players exploit physical and mental advantages to get to specific spots on the floor where the odds of success greatly outweigh the alternative. The amount of hours put in to achieve this mastery of body and mind to outplay an opponent is often what separates those who are considered very good in their era versus being considered very good for any era.

Kobe Bryant, whatever you think of him, has built his career on the idea that hard work and learning from his defeats and failures will get him where he wants to be. This idea is detailed wonderfully in this excellent longform piece by Chris Ballard that ran in this week’s Sports Illustrated. It is hard to argue with the results.

The piece linked above is well worth your time for a variety of reasons, but mostly because it is a snapshot in time at where Kobe is now, staring at his mortality as his career winds down. There are no more magic fixes from diet adjustments or extra workouts to put in that can reverse the impact of father time. And while the work will be done as diligently and with as much focus as it always has been, the fact remains that there is only so much work that can be done when you have already done as much as this man has.

I am thinking about this more today than others because, as the title of this post states, today is Kobe’s birthday. He is now 36 years old, entering into his 19th NBA season after being drafted as a 17 year old. You can do the math and see that Kobe has been an NBA’er more than half his life now, all those years soldiering for the team I root for.

Today, then, is as much a celebration for Kobe as it is for fans. He has given so much to the game he loves and, in turn, to us, the fans. Even if you hate him as a player, you will miss him when he’s gone. That, really, may be the quintessential statement about Kobe. He didn’t always do it the way you wanted him to, but by doing it his way he always gave us something worth discussing; worth marveling over. He may not have earned your cheers, but he certainly earned your respect.

With that, I’ll close with one of my favorite highlight clips of Kobe. It is titled “The Clinic” and has over 5 million views on youtube and targets plays from the 2007-2009 seasons. I love this video for a lot of reasons, but mostly because it captures the many aspects of Kobe’s game that reflect the work he’s put in. Sure, you see the athleticism, but you also see the footwork, the smarts, and the unrelenting attack style that his career has been built on. The video shows his genius as an all court player. Mostly, it shows the Kobe that I’ll mostly remember — devastating, driven, and the guy I loved to watch every night. Happy Birthday, Kobe.

Back in the summer 2002, Kobe wasn’t necessarily at the peak of his powers, but he was definitely at the top of the NBA world. The Lakers had just won their 3rd consecutive title and Kobe had cemented himself as one of the best players in the league. Kobe was also one of the league’s darling players — this was before the major public feuding with Shaq, before his legal issues, before trade demands. Every player has their detractors, but for the most part, Kobe was teflon.

So, you can only imagine the reaction when Kobe showed up at the famed Rucker Park in New York to play some pick up ball. You can also imagine the show he put on. Only, you know, you don’t have to imagine. You can actually watch it:

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The Lakers are back in action tonight in summer league, facing off against the 76ers in the first round of the “tournament” that has become the second half of the LVSL.

And while the results of this game matter — if the Lakers win they advance, if they lose their summer league is over — I’m not really going to get worked up over what the final score is. If anything, I want them to win only so I get to see more of Julius Randle (and to a slightly lesser extent Jordan Clarkson).

Randle’s performance is, ultimately, the major takeaway from this team. While there are other players who have shown promise, it is the player who the Lakers selected 7th overall whose performance matters most.

In Randle’s first game he did not perform very well and looked like a player who had only signed his contract 20 minutes before tip-off while also doubling as someone who had not played much basketball in recent months. His timing was off, he looked a bit sluggish at times, and wasn’t able to find a rhythm.

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