The Lakers continue their exhibition season tonight, facing the Warriors for the 2nd straight game. That first game didn’t go that well for the Lakers as the Dubs came out firing early to establish a lead they would never relinquish.

What was clear in Thursday’s game was that the Lakers simply were not able to deal with the outside shooting the Warriors offered while still being able to adequately cover the interior. On too many possessions, the Lakers were caught over helping inside, only to be a step slow recovering back to the wing while Klay Thompson or Steph Curry fired off another three pointer. Other times the Lakers were fine recovering toe the wing, but were not good at breaking down in their closeouts which led to the types of blow-by’s that put the interior defense on its heels. After the game, Byron Scott spoke about the poor defense and equated it to not playing hard enough, but what I saw was more about a lack of defensive talent against a team with superior offensive players.

Tonight, then, will be a chance to see which was actually more true. Can the Lakers stick with Thompson, Curry, Iguodala, Harrison Barnes, Draymond Green, and Brandon Rush? Can they do that and keep the interior clean by stonewalling David Lee and Andrew Bogut to keep them from getting easy looks? My guess is that the answers to these questions will be “no”, as even the best defenses will struggle to do these things this season. But Byron Scott expects better than what his team showed the last game so let’s see if he gets it.

Here are some other things to watch for tonight and some general thoughts on what I’d like to see:

*Who plays point guard? Jeremy Lin’s sprained ankle is likely to keep him out of the game tonight and with Jordan Clarkson sidelined with his strained calf, he will not play either. Steve Nash was rested in Thursday’s game, but we have not yet heard whether he will be active tonight. That leaves Ronnie Price as the only point guard without a question about his status. The hope is that Nash plays, but even if he does his minutes will likely be capped at 15-20. That leaves a boatload of minutes for Price unless someone else steals some time there.

*Will Randle look less “lost” and get more meaningful minutes? Julius Randle didn’t look great in his first stint on Thursday and led to him only getting 6 minutes of action in the first half and not any meaningful burn until garbage time late in the game. In garbage time, however, Randle did start to find his stride and played well in the closing stretch. Randle is still earning the trust of his coach and it would be nice if he could carry forward some of that late game play to the early part of this game in order to get some sustained playing time. The Warriors offer good “measuring stick” match ups for Randle and I would like to see him get some good minutes against Lee, Bogut, and the other veteran Warriors. I would also like to see Randle play more minutes with Kobe to give both players some time playing with the only other isolation creator on the team to see if that opens up chances for both players.

*More Ed Davis, please. Davis has been the Lakers’ best big man so far this preseason when factoring in play on both sides of the ball. He’s been quite effective and efficient on offense and has shown the best defensive instincts of any player (regardless of position). It would be nice if Davis could find some extended minutes (maybe at the expense of Boozer or Sacre) to see if he can keep it going when his workload increases.

*More pick and rolls, especially if Nash plays. Regardless of what you think about Byron Scott or his offense, there is enough flexibility in his sets to simply call for the P&R and run the action if the players want to. If you recall back to the Denver game, Lin and Davis ran that action repeatedly in the 2nd half and it was key to sustaining the team’s offense so they could hold onto the lead. Nash can be more assertive in calling for the pick and playing more two man game in the process rather than simply deferring to Kobe post-ups on the wing. If the Lakers are to be good enough on offense to be competitive, they must extract more value from their point guards than what they get as spot up shooters. Considering Nash and Lin thrive as ball handlers in the P&R, they must look for this action more when they are in the game.

Fast Break Thoughts

Darius Soriano —  October 10, 2014 — 37 Comments

After winning their preseason opener on Tuesday against the Nuggets, the Lakers served as a speed bump to a long range sniping Warriors’ team on Thursday. The Lakers fell behind early and never really recovered to make the score any more than cosmetically better. These are the types of games that will happen this season for this team as some nights they simply won’t have enough to appropriately respond to another team’s arsenal. They will play hard, but just won’t always play well.

After the game Byron Scott spoke about the need to play harder and, to be honest, there was some of that on display. But, for the most part, what Scott was saying was mostly coach speak with the reality being the Lakers faced a team better than them at most positions while also having the exact type of wing players who will challenge them consistently all year. Scott can try to manage that in a variety of ways, but facts are facts: when the Lakers face a team with dynamic wing scorers who can create from the arc to the rim they will struggle defensively as a team.

In any event, we’re now two games into the exhibition season and what we’ve seen has offered a few hints at what this team is working towards becoming and the trends that will drive that development. With that, here are some general thoughts about the Warriors game and what we can are seeing to this point in the preseason:

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The Lakers are back in action tonight, facing off against the Warriors in both team’s second preseason game. Like the Lakers, who dispatched the Nuggets in a quality showing, the Warriors took down the Clippers in their first game of the exhibition season.

It’s not that wins and losses really matter here, however. Both teams — but I’d imagine this is especially true for the Lakers with much more roster turnover — are seeking growth and a coming together under new coaches. Both sides, then, will want to show out well and look for incremental improvements that they can carry forward towards the start of the season at the end of the month.

For the Lakers, here are a few things worth paying attention to coming off Monday’s win:

*How do the rotations and lineup combinations change? It has already been strongly hinted that Steve Nash will rest tonight with Jeremy Lin moving into the starting lineup. This should trigger some minutes for Ronnie Price (who did not play on Monday) as well as get Jordan Clarkson some minutes as the long “PG” on the floor*. It will be interesting to see how Lin performs when paired with Kobe, especially related to his aggressiveness and how much control he takes of the offense when given the opportunity to push the ball. Lin did a very nice job of being a set up man on Monday (10 assists to a single turnover) and most of that work came when he put his head down, got into the paint, and drew extra defenders. He should look to be just as assertive in this game even when paired with Kobe. We’ll see if that is easier said than done, however.

*Can Randle build on a good performance from Monday? You’ll notice Byron Scott’s critiques on Randle have not been associated with his game or skill, but rather about his conditioning and how that affects his ability to play harder for longer. Randle will need to work on this, of course, and over time the hope is that his conditioning becomes less and less a concern. But what I am most interested in is whether he can to flash the skill, power, and poise he did on Monday. In this game he’ll have a variety of match ups that test him on both ends of the floor, likely facing off against lineups featuring David Lee, Andrew Bogut, Draymond Green, and Harrison Barnes. These guys will test him both as a traditional PF and as more of a stretch option. If Randle can perform well on both sides of the floor while showing off his ability to play multiple styles, he should only earn more minutes.

*Will the Lakers take more threes? This was a pretty hot topic on social media after Byron Scott said he was happy that the team only had 10 attempts from behind the arc on Monday while adding that he wants the team to shoot only 10 to 15 shots from downtown a night. This approach would fly in the face of more modern thinking about where the game is going and how to build a successful offense in today’s league. In saying that, while Scott’s comments should raise a red flag, I’ll see how things go on the court before making any final judgement. If the Lakers are turning down open threes to take contested twos or drive the ball into traffic that’s bad. I’ll also wait to see if a return of Young or Kelly augment the attempts per game as both of them use this shot as a staple of their games. I’ll have more thoughts on this later, but, again, I am taking a wait and see approach with this.

*How will the big man rotation play out? Carlos Boozer started on Monday (and will again tonight, presumably), but was arguable the least effective big man among the non-Sacre group. Hill, Davis, and Randle not only all put up better numbers, but looked a lot better in doing so. If that continues to be the case tonight (and I honestly think it will be), you have to wonder if Boozer’s role will start to get squeezed. Scott is known to be loyal to his veterans, but talent and production typically trumps all when it comes to these things. Especially when there is more than one alternative**.

*You didn’t think I’d forgotten about Kobe, did you? The tests only get more difficult for #24, moving on from Afflalo and Randy Foye to Klay Thompson, Andre Iguodala, and Green in this game. All three of those players will likely see some minutes defensively against Kobe and all three offer athleticism, length, and strong defensive pedigrees to give him problems. If Kobe can have a similarly effective night against that trio as he did against the Nuggets, I think we can begin to up our confidence in how well Kobe can actually perform this year.

All in all, this should be a good game. The Warriors should be one of the better teams in the West this year and even though this is only the preseason, it’s never too early to look at what an opponents is trying to do on the floor and see how you measure up when both team’s prime rotation players match up. You can watch this game on TWC Sportsnet and NBA TV nationally.

*Clarkson did a lot of ball handling on Monday, but did so while paired with mostly paired with Lin. If Nash really does not play, Clarkson will see more time with Price and Ellington. The latter can handle the ball some, but is not a PG by nature and that would give Clarkson more of an opportunity to be a distributor as the lead guard. We’ll see how he responds.

**While Hill and Davis are Centers for this team, because of what Scott likes to do on both sides of the ball, both could play together and squeeze Boozer’s minutes at PF even more. Scott has said that Boozer and Randle could play some together as well, but as a coach who is stressing defense as much as he is, I doubt he finds that a viable pairing for longer than only short stretches due to foul issues with his other bigs. In other words, if these other guys continue to play well while Boozer looks only average, that could be a problem for him. 

Yes, it was only one game. And yes, it’s too early to draw any lasting conclusions after this single game. But the Lakers showed some positive signs in their first preseason game, defeating the Nuggets 98-95 in an entertaining, if sometimes sloppy, affair.

In all honesty, there wasn’t a single thing that stood out most to me. Yes, Kobe Byrant looked very good. While his 5-12 shooting night doesn’t look great, at least two of those shots were taken with the clock winding down and from a disadvantageous position. And while his first jumper was an airball, he quickly found his stride thereafter, hitting several nice jumpers including a couple of his muscle-memory fading J’s from the baseline that we’ve seen so often over the course of his career:

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I understand you cannot actually see my face right now, but if you could, you would see that I am smiling. While it is only preseason, the Lakers are back, playing actual basketball that (sort of) matters for the first time since last April. It has been a long time. It has felt like a really, really long time.

The wait is over, though. The Lakers tip off tonight at 7pm PST against the Denver Nuggets*. The game should not be taken too seriously — it is the preseason, after all — but it should be viewed intently. The result may not matter in the big picture, but the process of what this team will become on the floor begins in earnest tonight**. And while that comes with countless caveats — from playing time, to rotations, to the presence of players who will not be on this roster in 4 weeks — I’ll take whatever Lakers’ basketball I can get at this point.

In saying all that, here are a few things worth paying special attention to when the ball tips off:

*Does Kobe look as good when not being defended by his own teammates? Like anyone else who has viewed the clips of Kobe practicing, I have been pleasantly surprised by how he’s looked physically and how well he’s been able to the things that Kobe would normally do on the floor. His post game has looked smooth. His jumper seems to be falling with consistently. His movement with and without the ball has not looked significantly different than I remember from when he was healthy. What needs to be said, though, is that all of this has come in short clips and against defenders who, in reality, are not especially tough match ups for him. No offense to Jordan Clarkson or Wayne Ellington or, even, Nick Young. But none of these guys offer the size or defensive acumen to offer much resistance against Kobe.

Tonight, though, he’ll be facing off against another team with better defenders (hello Arron Afflalo) and doing so in an actual game environment. Needless to say, this is a different test than the one Kobe has been, seemingly, passing with flying colors over the past week of training camp. If he can look as good tonight as he has against his own teammates, it will be further confirmation that he is “feeling like himself”.

*Julius Randle’s overall game. On Saturday the Lakers appeared on NBA TV’s “Real Training Camp” and one of the takeaways from that program was that Julius Randle is both really skilled and prone to getting really tired. Randle flashed a nice face up jumper (something he did not do in the Vegas Summer League), his above average handle, and some nice passing (two things he did show in Vegas). He also get extremely winded during head coach Byron Scott’s conditioning heavy practice, more than once looking out of breath and wanting for an extra couple of minutes of rest as the drills rolled on. This is to be somewhat expected — Randle didn’t do much physical activity at all between finishing his freshman season at Kentucky and when he was drafted and was already a player who could stand to get in better shape as camp approached. Beyond that, Scott’s practices have been heavy handed on the running and conditioning and as a rookie coming into his first camp you would expect there to be some culture shock to how things are done at this level.

In saying all that, I am interested in seeing how Randle plays when the bright lights are finally on and when he has that extra burst of adrenaline from being in game action. I also want to see if his full skill set is on display and what positions he is put in on the floor to use those skills.

*What will the big man rotation look like? Nick Young’s injury has thrown the wing rotation for a loop, but that should not be the case for the bigs. Save for Ryan Kelly, every other big is healthy and how Scott divides the minutes will be something to watch — even if it’s on the preseason. We already know that Boozer and Hill will start, but I’ll be interested in seeing how much burn Randle and Davis get, what combinations of those four (plus Sacre) are put on the floor, and how those pairings play together. Again, what we see tonight shouldn’t be forecasted as what will happen a month from now, but tonight’s action will reflect how Scott sees things early in camp. Hints like this can deepen our analysis and give us some insight we did not have before tonight.

*How much does Nash play and, more important, how does he look when he’s out there? When word came out of Saturday’s practice that Nash “tweaked” his ankle, there was a serious sense of “here we go again” when it comes to the veteran guard’s injury issues. But Nash practiced the next day and said he could have easily participated in Saturday’s evening session. As of now Nash is penciled in as the starter and will be run out there with the first group. I do not expect Nash to play more than 10-15 minutes tonight while Lin and Ronnie Price get heavier workloads. In saying that, though, Nash will see the Nuggets’ first team players and that will give him a nice barometer of where he’s at physically and what stage his game is at. Can he create his own shot? Can he be a semblance of the disruptive offensive player he’s been in the past? Can he get his teammates some open, easy shots? I’ll be very interested in seeing how the 40 year old looks.

*Has Wes Johnson really progressed? I was lukewarm on Wes’ return to the Lakers this summer. After watching Wes for a full season my analysis of his game was pretty simple: he’s a much better athlete than he is a basketball player. He often looked like a player who made up his mind on what he wanted to do early in a play and showed little ability to make the mental adjustments, both within a play and over the course of a game, that define how successful basketball players operate on the court. But Wes spent nearly the entire summer working out with Kobe Bryant, picking #24’s brain and getting schooled on the thinking aspects of the game and ideas like “economy of motion” that are meant to further maximize his physical gifts. People have been looking for Wes to break out since the time he entered the league. And while I think that ship has sailed, it’s not beyond his ability to make marginal improvements around the edges of his game to become a more efficient player than he was last year. Much of that will depend on the mental aspect of the game, however, and I am interested in seeing if he has made strides in that area.

Beyond that, there are many other things to watch — from Jordan Clarkson’s play to how the team is doing defensively to whether or not Ellington and Price impress as much in game action as  they have in practices. We’ll have more on all these topics, and more, in the next day or so.

*If you are in the LA market, you can watch the game on TWC Sportsnet. The game can also be viewed in NBA TV if you are not local.

**Practice, of course, is where all the habits of what this team will play like will actually be formed. That said, when the games come, their execution on the floor together will be forged and built in different ways. I am very interested in seeing how this team plays against opponents not wearing Lakers’ practice jerseys.