Archives For

Well, the Lakers added another big man in the mix. Here’s Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo! Sports:

It’s another cheap deal, just like the Lakers have been giving out throughout the offseason (except Swaggy P).

Davis was drafted 13th overall by the Toronto Raptors in 2010. He had a promising rookie season (averaging 7.7 points and 7.1 rebounds per game) before dropping off a bit. He was the supposed centerpiece of the Rudy Gay trade when Memphis acquired him but Lionel Hollins never gave him consistent minutes. He pretty much had the same role, too, when Dave Joerger took over. Davis only averaged 5.7 points and 4.1 rebounds per game in 15 minutes of play last season.

Ed Davis’s game isn’t the greatest offensively. He doesn’t have much going on in the post. However, on the defensive end, he’s been a pretty good rim protector and tends to affect a lot of shots inside. His athleticism is salivating but, unfortunately, he doesn’t seem to have improved much since he first got drafted due to not playing consistently.

Low-risk, high-reward. We’ll see how Ed Davis does with L.A.

Assistant coach Mark Madsen is coaching the Lakers Summer League team. We caught up with him after their thrilling win last night against the Warriors.

FORUM BLUE & GOLD: There’s no head coach yet. Thre’s really no system in place. What do you tell the guys out there?

MM: Well, we’re trying to run a lot of generic NBA sets more than anything. We’re trying to help guys learn the basics of the NBA. So right now a lot of stuff we put in, if the new head coach wants to use it, he can because it’s generic sets out of the NBA.

FB&G: Who’s impressed you the most thus far?

MM: A lot of guys impress me. Kendall Marshall, with the stabilizing influence. Julius Randle played a great game. He was aggressive, he attacked… he gave multiple efforts. DeAndre Kane had a big-time effort off the bench. Quinton Ross, who hadn’t played for a couple of camps, went out there and did a great job.

FB&G: The Lakers went through their worst season in forever. What have you, as an assistant coach, learned from this?

MM: You learn that you always keep working and you always keep trying. No matter how bad it looks, you have to continue onward, knowing that things can always change later.

FB&G: So why not you as head coach?

MM: *laughs* I don’t have the experience. Hopefully in five years, that’ll be a conversation we can have.

FB&G: That’s a long wait, man.

MM: Look, man. You gotta be patient.

We’d like to thank the always-awesome Mark Madsen for stopping by.

Kendall Marshall has an unguaranteed contract going into next season. He’s on the Lakers Summer League team and is averaging 8.7 points, 3.3 rebounds, and 3.7 assists in three games. He stopped by to answer a few questions.

FORUM BLUE & GOLD: You were out of the league for a bit before catching on with the Lakers. What did you learn from being out?

KENDALL MARSHALL: You can’t take this opportunity for granted. It was something that made me appreciate what I did have. And when it was taken from me… basketball, to me, is my life. So I felt like a big part of me was taken away. I’m extremely blessed to be in this situation I’m in now and I just want to take full advantage of it.

FB&G: What did Coach Madsen tell you to run out there? Or are they just letting you freestyle?

KM: We definitely have sets, plays that we call… things that we’ve been working on in practice. It’s a different offense than what I learned last year… I’m still learning.

FB&G: What do you intend to improve on for next season?

KM: One thing is remaining aggressive from the point guard position… not having them guard us four-on-five as well as just mastering the pace of the game and mastering getting guys open shots. And defensively, keeping point guards in front of me.

FB&G: What do you say to people who remark about your set shot?

KM: Look at guys that have been successful that have set shots. Guys like Andre Miller. It’s not all about shooting jumpshots. There’s a thousand ways to score a basketball. Guys like Mark Jackson. Guys that have been successful that didn’t jump 20 feet on jumpshots.

Much thanks to Kendall Marshall for a few minutes of his time.

Another Laker is staying with the team. Here is Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo! Sports with the report.

My reaction? That’s a lot of money. Now I will never criticize players for getting as much paper as they can but this seems like a bunch of cash.

Maybe we can hope for increased production, considering the Lakers really don’t have any bigs beyond Robert Sacre and rookie Julius Randle. Hill averaged 9.7 points and 7.4 rebounds in under 21 minutes per game, all career-bests. While we love Hill’s motor, he tends to run out of gas pretty quickly since he doesn’t seem to pace himself very well.

Nevertheless, maybe he’ll learn to pace himself on an increased role. There were times where he looked absolutely brilliant, having a few 20-15 games under his belt last season. But he also got inconsistent playing time last season with Mike D’Antoni. Maybe he’ll get a lot of PT under the new coach, who we STILL don’t know as of this writing.

But, hey, we’re getting some semblance of a team now. Good for Jordan Hill on securing a job and getting that pay raise.

It looks like the Los Angeles Lakers will be looking for a new head coach for the next season. Per Ramona Shelburne of ESPN…

For days, D’Antoni wanted his option year exercised by the team. The Lakers continuously did not budge and, as a result, he has resigned from his position.

D’Antoni came in as the Laker head coach (instead of Phil Jackson as we all know by now) after Mike Brown was fired five games into the 2012-13 season. He has clashed with many players on the team, including Dwight Howard (who has since departed to become a Houston Rocket) and Pau Gasol. I did feel he was dealt a bad hand as the Lakers in the last couple of years have been riddled with injuries. But I also feel he didn’t make the best of what he had as guys like Jordan Hill and Chris Kaman got inconsistent playing time (basically 40 minutes in one game and DNP the next).

Now the Lakers are really going to get a fresh start. The only signed Lakers this coming season are Kobe Bryant, Robert Sacre, and Steve Nash.

D’Antoni finished with a 67-87 (.435) record with the Lakers. He also had stints with the Nuggets, Suns, and the Knicks.

It’s pretty tough to win a game when your roster is depleted. And the Suns took advantage of that as they beat an undermanned Laker team, 121-114.

The Lakers essentially played seven (Robert Sacre didn’t play) the entire game. Nick Young was kicked out of the game after he took a swing at Suns rookie center Alex Len and Goran Dragic. Len whacked Young in the face during a dunk attempt. Young had every right to be upset but he has to control his emotions better. I know; it’s easier said than done. A lot of people would react the same way, too, after such a dangerous play like that.

But enough of that. This wasn’t exactly a well-played game by both teams. The Lakers looked flat early on both sides as the Suns got off to an 8-0 start. The game was sloppy a lot of the time and the Suns outlasted the tired Lakers, who were playing on a back-to-back.

The Lakers were, as expected, atrocious on defense. They couldn’t stop anybody in the paint (64 points inside by the Suns) and they let Phoenix run on them (36 fastbreak points). The Suns also had a 53-43 advantage on the boards (16-8 on the offensive end). And once again, the third quarter proved to be disastrous for Los Angeles as they were outscored, 34-24. A quick 9-0 run by the Suns in the middle of the fourth proved to be the mountain that the Lakers couldn’t scale.

Gerald Green had a season-high 28 points as he seemed like he couldn’t miss any of those funky jumpers he took. Markieff Morris couldn’t be stopped inside (24 points) and Channing Frye had a big game (20 points). And I didn’t even mention Goran Dragic’s excellent all-around game (18-10-7).

As for the Lakers, it really hurt to not have Nick Young after the second quarter (who had scored 9 quick points). Kendall Marshall was distributing well (13 assists) but shot poorly (4 for 16, 10 points). Wesley Johnson (22 points) and Chris Kaman (18 points) with Young out. Pau Gasol got going late (24 points) but it was too late by then. But when they needed a shot, Nick Young was usually the one to bail them out and he obviously wasn’t there. Marshall looked uncomfortable shooting the ball and it showed when he passed up a wide open three late in the game.

All-in-all, it was a sloppy game to watch despite what the scoreboard said. Just that the Lakers couldn’t stop anybody (which has been a theme for the last six games; all opponents have scored 110 or more in that stretch) whether it’s in the halfcourt or in transition. The Lakers fall to 14-25 and at this point, watching a Laker game is equivalent to going to the dentist.

The Lakers go against the Celtics on Friday as they reengage themselves in combat. No, really. In Combat (Darius is going to hate me for making that joke).

In any case, it would be nice to see a win on Friday. This losing thing gets old really, really fast. The Lakers have lost 12 of the last 13 games. Hey, remember a few years ago when the Lakers lost only 17 games in the regular season?

Man, I miss 2009.

Well, the Lakers opened up a roster spot.

His contract was unguaranteed and it was going to be guaranteed if he wasn’t let go by the team by 5:00 P.M. Eastern today. I was a bit surprised by the move but with the Lakers opening up a spot, I wonder what the next move is for the Lakers because I don’t believe they’re just going to stand pat.

Williams has played 32 out of a possible 34 games this season. He’s started 11 of those contests and is averaging 5.2 points and 4.5 boards for the season.

I suppose this opens up more time for Chris Kaman, Jordan Hill, and Ryan Kelly, who has been getting a lot of time as of late. But head coach Mike D’Antoni has used so many line-ups so who knows who’s actually getting more time?

Anyway, let’s see what the Lakers do next.

Well, it never stops for the Lakers. This season has been tough because of the myriad of injuries the Lakers have been getting. Add another one to the list.

The Lakers’ latest press release has Jordan Farmar out for a minimum of four weeks.

EL SEGUNDO – Lakers guard Jordan Farmar had an ultrasound test and was examined by Dr. Luga Podesta this morning after injuring his left hamstring in last night’s game versus the Milwaukee Bucks. Results show that Farmar has a tear in his left hamstring, which is expected to keep him out a minimum of four weeks.

Farmar left Tuesday’s game early due to some “tightness” on his hamstring. Now we know why.

This leaves Kendall Marshall, who was just acquired a couple of weeks ago because of the ridiculous number of injuries the team has received, as the only point guard left on the roster. Even Xavier Henry, who was a swingman playing the back-up point guard role, is out for at least the next week because of a knee injury. It looks like Marshall will play extended minutes until one of the point guards return. Steve Blake is due to be back in a few weeks from that elbow injury. Kobe Bryant, who played point guard in his short healthy stint this season, is out for a month or so. And we all have no idea when Steve Nash is coming back.

Regardless, this is just painful. All the injuries racked up has made this Laker season even tougher to watch. Farmar wasn’t exactly the savior of this franchise; the Lakers just wanted someone who can actually play point guard. And once again, we’re down to one. At least, it’s better than having NO point guards?

Farmar is averaging 8.7 points and 4.7 assists in the 22 games he has played this season. Get well soon, Jordan.