Archives For lamar odom

From the limited exposure we’ve had to Mike Brown via press conferences and sit down interviews, we’ve learned a few things about what he plans to do with the current Laker roster on the offensive side of the ball. He will implore the team to play a bit faster by having his guys push the ball up court and initiate the offense quicker. He wants to get Kobe the ball “in his spots” in order to maximize his effectiveness. He plans to utilize some of the offensive sets from his days as a Spurs assistant coach to take advantage of his twin towers of Pau Gasol and Andrew Bynum. And while all of this sounds great – after all, these are the key players to the Lakers’ offensive attack – one name we haven’t heard come out of Mike Brown’s mouth very often is Lamar Odom.

But make no mistake, Lamar Odom will need to be involved for the Lakers to truly excel on offense.

In the past 4 seasons Odom has been a key contributor on offense, using his well rounded game to both be a complimentary player and a primary option in the Lakers’ offensive sets. Phil Jackson used Odom’s versatility expertly by having him initiate the triangle offense, run pick and rolls as both a ball handler and a finisher, play off the ball as a slasher, post up smaller players, isolate slower defenders, push the ball as a middle man on the break, and space the floor in lineups where Kobe and either Gasol or Bynum worked the post. Odom’s ability to do all of these things effectively gave him immense value and created a variety of mismatches whenever he was on the court.

However, as the Lakers transition away from the Triangle and into a more traditional offense it’s fair to ask how Odom will fit into this new scheme. Some open questions:

  • Will Odom still have a lot of ball handling responsibilities?
  • Will Odom still initiate the offense?
  • Will Odom work more as a post player ala Gasol and Bynum or more as a perimeter power forward?
  • Will Odom have the freedom to still push the ball in transition or will he be bottled into the more traditional role of a big man?

As of today, we don’t have answers to these questions but I can only hope that we can say “yes” to all of the above. Odom’s versatility is his biggest asset on this team and putting him in positions to explore his full skill set is the best way to maximize his value. Mike Brown has spoken extensively about trying to get the most out of his players, but doing that with Odom may be his most difficult job as an X’s and O’s practitioner next year.

Understand that Odom was the Lakers best pick and roll player last year when you combine the ability to initiate and finish in the set. His ability to create off the dribble for himself or his teammates is second to only Kobe and his instincts on when to pass and when to shoot probably surpass #24’s. Odom works effectively in space with and without the ball and getting him moving into the free space to take advantage of the attention Kobe/Gasol/Bynum draw is one of the best ways to create high percentage shots without having to run an actual play. Not to mention he’s one of the team’s best offensive rebounders so putting him in position to still attack the glass is also a key.

Can Mike Brown’s offense do all of these things for Odom; can his sets put Odom in positions to utilize such a wide variety of skills? The triangle naturally set Odom up to use all his natural ability by limiting the play calls and letting the players read and react to the defense. This let the players’ ability take over and put their versatility on full display. On any given possession Odom would bring the ball up and then shift from the two guard front to the to the wing; he’d set up shop at the elbow or sink into the short corner; he’d work to the middle of the paint off flashes and dive cuts, doing it all based off what the D was doing. On one side of the floor he’d be involved in a pick and roll with one of the big men, making an entry pass and then cutting to the rim looking for an easy score or setting up for the offensive rebound. On another possession he’d isolate at the top of the key in a 1-4 set or hang back behind the arc and shoot the long ball. But in Mike Brown’s O – one in which he’s stated the PG, SG, and SF are interchangeable parts as initiators and where big men are post up players and screeners – where does Odom fit in?

Will he play like a guard? Like a big man? Can he do both for Brown like he did for Phil?

Carving out a role will be key, but in an offensive system where players usually play more conventional roles it will be interesting to see how one of the more unconventional players in the league is used. As a power forward, Odom can do it all but what will his coach ask him to do? And when he asks him, will it stifle his skill set or allow it to flourish? Right now, I have my questions and concerns as to how this will actually play out. We’ll know more when the games start, but the fact is we’ll have to wait because Mike Brown isn’t offering any clues as to how the versatility of Odom will be tapped into.

While it’s not yet official, it’s being reported that Lamar Odom will be named the NBA’s Sixth Man of the Year later today. This is great news and I’m thrilled for Lamar being recognized for his fantastic season. His statistics speak for themselves, but even more impressive to these eyes has been his ability to shift between starter and reserve and fully embrace whatever role is thrown at him, all while playing top flight basketball for the entire season.

It’s been said many times over, but Odom really is the glue to this Laker team. He’s a leader, the bridge between the starters and the reserves, and probably the most beloved teammate in the Laker locker room. His ability to stay grounded and always do what’s best for the team shows a selflessness that is very much needed on a team where a precious few consistently get the accolades even though everyone contributes to the success of the group. His humble nature only reinforces the sacrifice that is a requirement on any team expected to contend for the championship. In a way, he’s been the most consistent Laker and could easily be described as indispensable. Not too shabby for a guy that some questioned would ever live up to his potential on this team.

And while I wish Odom could have also gotten that coveted all-star berth that’s eluded him his entire career, this award isn’t such a bad consolation. It only reaffirms his value to this team and shines a light on how consistently good he’s been this year as a key cog to the team’s success. So, again, a big congrats to my favorite lefty. He earned this award with a stellar campaign. Now, there’s only one more piece of hardware to win (and I’m sure he’d trade today’s trophy for that other one handed out in June).

Over the years there are few players that I’ve grown to appreciate more than Lamar Odom.  His all around game and ability to stand on equal footing with both the starters and reserves while serving as the bridge between both units has been invaluable the Lakers’ recent success.  Through all the ups and downs he’s shown toughness, versatility, and best of all the determination of a champion.  This season he’s seemingly took another step forward in his evolution as a player by being a leader for a Team USA squad that brought home gold at the World Championships and now (again) filling in for an injured Andrew Bynum by playing some of the best basketball he ever has.

So, with that said, join me in wishing LO a happy birthday and enjoy the highlight package below.  I shudder to think where this Lakers team would be without him the last few seasons, but can assure you that it wouldn’t be in the position to be called back to back defending NBA champions.

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Part deuce of our look at key stats for the upcoming season focuses on the bench corps. In case you missed it, check out our post on the starters too.

Lamar Odom: O/U 30 games as a starter
Fisher and Bryant are used to receiving props for their durability, but Odom proved that he belongs in the Lakers iron man conversation too after playing in all 82 games in 2009-2010. As the starting center on Team U.S.A. this summer, Lamar entered training camp this week with only a few weeks of rest. His load figures to be even heavier to start the season now that Bynum is out for at least the first few weeks, leaving Odom as the go-to starter. The Lakers have been able to weather his inconsistency as a sixth man the past two seasons, but will especially need Lamar to elevate his game while Andrew heals. Going off of Bynum’s own timeline, Odom is a virtual lock to start the first 15-20 games of the season. The Lakers can only hope it stays around that number and far away from the 38 games he started last season.

Sasha Vujacic: O/U 37% three-point shooting percentage
Sasha fell out of favor with Lakers coaches and unfortunately, back into the “practice player” label too as he only connected on 31% of his three-pointers during the regular season–down from his career average of 37%. Here’s hoping his much-improved performance in the final two rounds of the playoffs is more indicative of his play this season.

Luke Walton: O/U 70 games played
Luke was largely a forgotten man in last season’s championship run after appearing in only 29 games due to a pinched nerve in his back. Heading into 2009-2010, Walton’s troublesome back remains a bit of a ticking time bomb for the Lakers. Though they’ve proved that they can win without him, Luke’s expert knowledge of the offense is an undervalued commodity on a second unit that will be lacking triangle wherewithal. If his back holds up, it’d sure be nice to see him play close to a full season.

Matt Barnes: O/U 38% three-point shooting
The Lakers expect stellar defensive tenacity and intagibles out of Barnes, but they also need him to spread the floor from the three spot, similar to the player he’ll likely be subbing for the most—Artest. Matt shot 32% from beyond the arc during the regular season in 2009-2010, but improved to almost 38% during the playoffs—a trend that L.A. is hoping continues this season. Barnes proved himself a capable, if unspectacular offensive player during recent playoff runs with the Warriors and Magic, but finding consistency in his outside shooting will go a long way toward shoring up L.A.’s second unit this season.

Steve Blake: O/U 3.0 assist-to-turnover ratio
Blake has been quietly dropping bombs from three point land for years now, hitting 40% of his treys last season (23rd in the league). However, equally important to the Lakers’ success this season will be his ability to lead the offense in a way that his predecessor Jordan Farmar never quite mastered. Blake ranked 13th in the league last season with a 2.97 assist-to-turnover ratio and could do a lot worse than replicating that number this season. Early reports out of training camp from Coach Jackson and Kobe indicate that Steve is already taking control of the team, which bodes well for next season.

Shannon Brown: O/U 2.5 assists
After a sub par regular season and playoff run for Shannon, his second full season with the Lakers is all about the other tricks in his bag. For starters, he can improve his nearly 1:1 assist-to-turnover ratio—an ugly stat that is unfortunately mostly consistent with his inconsistent decision-making. When Brown first joined the forum blue and gold, there was preliminary talk about his ability to potentially supplant Fisher as the team’s starting point guard, thanks to his ball-handling and the strong potential he showed as a man-to-man defender. He obviously isn’t the answer the team is looking at the one spot anymore, but he remains a vital spark plug in the 20 minutes or so he plays off of the bench.

Theo Ratliff: O/U 1.5 blocks
Ratliff was a shot-blocking fiend during his prime and will be asked to recapture some of that magic as the Lakers’ third-string big man. With Andrew missing the first month of the season, Theo moves one rung up the ladder. At this stage of his career, Ratliff is a bit of a one trick pony, but his specialty—blocking shots—is something that L.A. despertaely needs from its second unit.

Derrick Caracter: O/U 275 lbs
So far, so good on the Derrick Caracter weight watch as the the versatile forward entered training camp in compliance with the team-mandated weight clause. The Lakers will certainly keep a close watch on his conditioning throughout the season, and if he sustains his motivation, he could get some quality burn even in Coach Jackson’s notoriously anti-rookie regime. The odds of this happening, of course, also depend on the collective health of Walton and Bynum.

Devin Ebanks: O/U 1.5 steals per 40 minutes
It’s difficult to pinpoint a stat for a player who isn’t expected to see much time on the floor this season, but I, along with the Lakers, view Ebanks as a potentially very strong defender in the same vein as Trevor Ariza. For that reason, it would be great to see him channel the former Lakers forward as a go-to defender on the wing, agile enough to guard some of the league’s larger point guards, but still sturdy enough to do battle with the NBA’s elite small forwards.

In Praise Of Team USA

Darius Soriano —  September 13, 2010

ISTANBUL, TYRKEY. SEPTEMBER 13, 2010. USA's Chauncey Billups and Lamar Odom (L-R front) hold up the trophy as the US team celebrate their 81-64 victory over Turkey in the final of the 2010 FIBA World Championship at Istanbul's Sinan Erdem Dome. (Photo ITAR-TASS/ Roman Kruchinin) Photo via Newscom

Yesterday, Team USA did what many thought they could or would not do – they won the FIBA World Championships Tournament and cemented their status as the best basketball playing nation on the planet.  The American team defeated host nation Turkey 81-64 and cruised to the title by playing the type of pressure team defense and Kevin Durant fueled offense that carried them the entire tournament.  A hearty congratulations to the U.S. team.

This is a team that earned our respect for a variety of reasons.  First and foremost is the fact that many actually picked a different nation to claim this title.  With the U.S. not returning a single player from the 2008 Olympic gold medal team, many saw a young, inexperienced team, that lacked size and leadership.  Many labled them the B-team.  But, as Kevin Durant tweeted after the game: “B-team huh?? Haaaaa we got it done…US, seat pleasant, dc, oklahoma city…we did it for yall..GOLD MEDALIST”. 

Secondly, they played a brand of team basketball that many were unsure they could actually play.  Guys that many may see as second (or even third) tiered players that are asked to carry their NBA teams on most nights, abandoned any selfishness and contributed to wins by playing to their individual strengths that can sometimes be dormant when they put on their NBA jerseys for their respective teams stateside.  I mean, watching Andre Iguodala become a defensive and rebounding force while eschewing taking shots for the betterment of the team? Rudy Gay doing the same?  Eric Gordon hustling on defense to the point that he caused shot clock violations almost single handed?  Sure these players have shown in flashes that they are capable of playing this way, but to show a nearly complete committment to playing the role(s) that the coaches envisioned for them on a nightly basis was a great treat.  The fact that their perseverance was rewarded with the ultimate payoff only reinforces what the U.S. is capable of doing in international competition – regardless of the make up of the roster.

Below are a few notes on some of the players with some random thoughts gleaned from the gold medal game and the tournament as a whole:

*Kevin Durant is a monster.  I suppose you could say that we knew this already and that this is no revelation.  However, his performances in the elimination portion of the tournament were exceptional.  Not only was his scoring fantastic (99 points combines in the final 3 games) but his defense and rebounding were top shelf too.  Plus, his ability to raise his game in the big moments was just fantastic.  It seemed like any time the U.S. needed a big bucket, Durant was there to put the ball through the hoop.  Whether by driving to the hole, showing off his impressive handle and mid range game, or by bombing away from long distance, Durant continued to prove he’s as dynamic an offensive player we have in the world while also showing a great understanding of “the moment”.  Some players that show that they’re the former never quite prove to be the latter, but Durant is both.  What a talent.

*As far as explosive guards go, I don’t know if there is one better than Russell Westbrook right now.  Sure, there are more complete PG’s (Paul and Williams immediately come to mind) and there are better floor generals (Nash, Rondo) but Russell is the type of guard that can get you out of your chair in an instant.  His quickness, strength, and athleticism combination is unmatched (even by Derek Rose) by any other point guard and measuring these traits for a “pound for pound” argument, I would say he’s right up there with some of the best athletes in the entire league (yes, even Lebron, Wade, and Howard).  And sure his jumper needs some work and he can be a bit out of control at times, but focusing on the things he struggles with means you’re missing the point with this player.  Westbrook is just a fantastic young player that will only continue to grow and get better.  The sky is the limit for him.  (On a side note, you notice the first two players I’ve mentioned play for the Thunder? Yikes.)

*I already mentioned Iguodala, but he deserves even more praise.  His rebounding and defense were top notch the entire tournament and the self-less way he played deserves recognition.  And while his size and physique (you saw his Karl Malone arms, right?) sometimes had him miscast as a defensive stopper against some of the smaller, quicker guards in this tourney, his overall play on that side of the floor was stellar.  Add that to the fact that he willingly moved the ball and really only looked for his shot in transition situations and off hard penetration showed me that he’s also extremely coach-able and understanding of what winning basketball is.  I know when he goes back to Philly they’ll ask him to be the do it all scorer/playmaker for his team, but I shudder to think of what he could be playing next to an elite scorer like Durant where all you asked him to do defend, rebound, and slash off the ball.

*Quietly, Lamar Odom did exactly what he was asked to do and did it well, overall, for this U.S. team.  Yes he showed that his inconsistencies can be as great as his talent level, but in the end he battled hard in the medal round and once again proved his worth to a winning team.  The man just does all the little things well and it was very nice to see him step up in the second half of the gold medal game to help turn a semi-contested game into a contest that wasn’t that close down the stretch.  Whether it was rebounding, bodying up bigger offensive players, starting the American’s fast break with pin point outlet passes, or slashing into the open space for either finishes or to make the extra pass on offense, the man filled a bunch of roles for this team and deserves his credit as a World Champion twice over (FIBA and NBA) in the same year. 

*On a not so positive note, I was not that impressed with Chauncey Billups in this tournament.  While he showed good presence as a floor general by aligning his teammates in the half court offense, he also often broke off too many possessions to fire up long range jumpers early in the shot clock.  I know that Billups has long been a fan of the “dagger” three pointer that can salt away the hopes of the opponent, but in the last few games I thought he went for these shots too often and did so in situations where it was not required.  I thought his defense was good, but that it wasn’t to the level of Westbrook and Gordon. 

*Lastly, on a confused note, I’m not sure why Kevin Love didn’t play more.  Without a representative (be it Coach K or anyone else) commenting on it, I would assume it had to do with the want to always have the most athletic team on the floor at all times that saw Love’s minutes decrease.  But, for a guy that rebounds and passes very well while also having some range on his jumper to only see one minute of game time in the gold medal game?  I just don’t get it.  When Turkey was really giving the U.S. fits in the first half with their zone defense, I really thought a Love/Odom front court with Durant, Westbrook, and either Billups or Gordon would have been a great line up to try out.  But alas, Coach K kept the T’Wolves’ big man glued to the bench.